BHM is honored to be a Ronald McDonald House Charities Global Grant Recipient

This funding will to provide mobile medical care to 3,200 to 6,400 children in the conflict zones of northern and eastern Burma via 3-6 additional Backpack Medics teams, who provide medical and community health services to children 5 and under.

The Burma regime has isolated the eastern and northern sections of the country, allowing no health care. For 60 years, the regime has launched an aggressive campaign of violence and forced labor on the Karen, Kachin and other minorities in the eastern and northern Burma. The results are horrific: infant, child and maternal mortality rates from malaria, dysentery, malnutrition, pneumonia and other preventable diseases is extraordinarily high. 1 in 7 children dies before the age of 5 where there are no medic teams.

Backpack medic teams of 3-5 trained health workers travel throughout the areas providing medical care and community health services focused on children. 60% of children’s deaths could be prevented with basic medicine (such as penicillin), provided by the backpack medics. The impact where the medics reach is profound: malaria deaths are down by 48% and 42% for dysentery among children 5 and under. Likewise, the maternal mortality rate is reduced by over two-thirds.

Care is provided at two levels. First Village Health Volunteers (VHV) reinforce sanitation and disease prevention practices, are continually present in each village. In addition, traditional birth assistants provide midwifery support to pregnant women and newborns. Second, backpack medic teams visit 9-12 villages/month (2-3 days/village), providing responsive and preventative care. Responsive care includes diagnosing and administering medicines for malaria, dysentery, pneumonia, worms and malnutrition common in infants. Preventative care includes distribution of Vitamin A, de-worming meds, building latrines and sanitary water supplies for villages and school.

The funds will provide medicine kits to 3 to 6 new backpack medic teams urgently needed in Kachin State, where the regime violated an 18-year ceasefire by attacking villages while seizing land. An additional 250,000 Kachin people have fled their homes.

The backpack medic program is unique in that it brings the care and medicine to the infants as their families seek sanctuary in Internally Displaced Person camps or in isolated villages. Currently, the medics serve a population of 205,000 people each year. The medic teams are 100% ethnic minorities from Burma – they are caring for their own.

Read the Ronald McDonald House Charities Global press release to learn more about the other amazing projects being supported.

BHM is honored to be a Ronald McDonald House Charities Global Grant Recipient

This funding will to provide mobile medical care to 3,200 to 6,400 children in the conflict zones of northern and eastern Burma via 3-6 additional Backpack Medics teams, who provide medical and community health services to children 5 and under.

The Burma regime has isolated the eastern and northern sections of the country, allowing no health care. For 60 years, the regime has launched an aggressive campaign of violence and forced labor on the Karen, Kachin and other minorities in the eastern and northern Burma. The results are horrific: infant, child and maternal mortality rates from malaria, dysentery, malnutrition, pneumonia and other preventable diseases is extraordinarily high. 1 in 7 children dies before the age of 5 where there are no medic teams.

Backpack medic teams of 3-5 trained health workers travel throughout the areas providing medical care and community health services focused on children. 60% of children’s deaths could be prevented with basic medicine (such as penicillin), provided by the backpack medics. The impact where the medics reach is profound: malaria deaths are down by 48% and 42% for dysentery among children 5 and under. Likewise, the maternal mortality rate is reduced by over two-thirds.

Care is provided at two levels. First Village Health Volunteers (VHV) reinforce sanitation and disease prevention practices, are continually present in each village. In addition, traditional birth assistants provide midwifery support to pregnant women and newborns. Second, backpack medic teams visit 9-12 villages/month (2-3 days/village), providing responsive and preventative care. Responsive care includes diagnosing and administering medicines for malaria, dysentery, pneumonia, worms and malnutrition common in infants. Preventative care includes distribution of Vitamin A, de-worming meds, building latrines and sanitary water supplies for villages and school.

The funds will provide medicine kits to 3 to 6 new backpack medic teams urgently needed in Kachin State, where the regime violated an 18-year ceasefire by attacking villages while seizing land. An additional 250,000 Kachin people have fled their homes.

The backpack medic program is unique in that it brings the care and medicine to the infants as their families seek sanctuary in Internally Displaced Person camps or in isolated villages. Currently, the medics serve a population of 205,000 people each year. The medic teams are 100% ethnic minorities from Burma – they are caring for their own.

Read the Ronald McDonald House Charities Global press release to learn more about the other amazing projects being supported.

A conduit for change

As conditions in Burma remain desperate for the people living in eastern and northern Burma, Burma Humanitarian Mission has expanded its support to Backpack Medics – the primary source of medical care and community health services in these areas.

For the past 6 decades, the Burma regime has conducted a campaign of oppression and suppression of the ethnic minorities. The minorities – the Karen in the east, the Kachin in the north, Mon in the south – sought to live free and maintain their language, culture and religion. The regime, however, sought to preserve the state of Burma without any changes. The sustained campaign of violence was aimed to prevent the minorities from maintaining their identity.

As a result of the oppression, conditions in eastern Burma have been horrific. In places where there are no Backpack medics:

• 1 in 14 infants die before their first birthday

• 1 in 7 children die before their 5th birthday – 10 times the rate in Thailand

• The maternal mortality rate is 15 times the rate in Thailand

• 1 in 10 suffer from diarrhea and dysentery

• 1 in 5 suffer from malaria

• 1 in 5 from Acute Respiratory Infection (pneumonia)

• 2 in 5 children suffer from acute malnutrition

• 60% of all children’s deaths could have been prevented with basic meds

To counter these trends, the Karen and others formed backpack medic teams to care for their own people. In 1998, 120 medics comprised 32 teams and treated 64,000 people. In 2012, these grew to 95 teams caring for over 200,000 people.

Where the teams operate, deaths from malaria are down by 48%, from dysentery are down by 51%, and infant mortality has been reduced over 3 fold.

In 2012, Burma Humanitarian Mission supported these 8 of the 95 teams with 1 million doses of medicine for more than 23,000 people. During this time, BHM’s supported medics

• Supported 680 births

• Treated 536 patients with dysentery/diarrhea

• Treated 1,119 malaria patients

• Treated over 1,317 patients with acute pneumonia

• Treated 504 patients with severe anemia

• Treated over 500 patients with the measles

• Treated 4 gunshot victims – saving 4 lives

• Treated 2 landmine victims – saving 2 lives

As we moved into 2013, our support has grown. We’ve added support for 2 additional medic teams, growing the population we support to over 28,000 people with 1.2 million doses of medicine. This support will include over 15,000 doses of anti-malarial treatments – vital to saving lives.

We are often asked who are big donors are. The answer is simple: everyone. Over 85% of all donations come from individuals contributing $10 or more. Where $1 provides 40 doses of medicine…or $7 outfits a medic team with the lifesaving drugs needed for 1 day…or $25 buys the penicillin needed for a team for 6 months…there’s no donation too small NOT to make a big difference.

In a society where many people feel isolated or incapable of effecting change, Burma Humanitarian Mission provides a conduit for individuals to have a real positive impact on those who have no hope…but for their generosity.

Connecting Communities

Conditions in Burma continue to be deadly for the ethnic minority groups living in northern and eastern Burma.

During the month of October, the Burma army attacked the Kachin people (in northern Burma) at least 15 times. Among the assaults, the army shelled villages with mortars and artillery. At least one child was killed, 2 more children injured and 1 adult also injured. This violence occurred against a backdrop of ‘lesser’ crimes, such as villagers forced to carry supplies or work for the army (at no pay), to be human shields and the persistent use of rape as a form to intimate villagers.

In November, things have not gotten better. For three days, the Burma army attacked near Makhaw Yan village. The combined artillery and infantry assaults resulted in the death of a 15 year old.

Meanwhile, across Burma as a whole, more than 1,000 individuals remain jailed as political prisoners.

At the same time, major donor nations are stepping back from support to community based organizations who provide grass-roots social, educational and medical services. Australia announced that they will no longer support the Dr Cynthia’s Mae Tao clinic – a fundamental source of medical care for displaced and impoverished minorities from Burma.

Such news reports are overshadowed by reports of Aung San Suu Kyi has departed Burma for a tour of Europe. At the same time, a plethora of international companies are moving into Burma to take advantage of the underdeveloped resources – hyrdro-power, gems, gold, timber and the like.
These are clearly mixed signals about conditions and life in Burma.
In light of such an environment, what do fair-minded, compassionate individuals do? How can they be a positive force of change to make positive things happen?

Get involved with the ‘small’ non-profits like us. These organizations provide a conduit for positive change. Donations, sacrifices from one’s monthly budget, do go directly to those who need the support.

Burma Humanitarian Mission had a volunteer recently who realized the personal value of this process. The individual ran a marathon as part of the Run for Burma team. He ran as a means to raise awareness and funds. He shared afterwards how this opportunity transformed his life:

“Run for Burma not only gave me something to contribute to, but awakened me to issues that I hadn’t followed in the past. And, it brought friends and family closer–merging what I like to do (running) and with something they can do.”

So, what did this runner do when he raised $500? The runner’s efforts will support a medic team for 1 month in Burma. This team will be the sole source of medical and health care for between 2,000 and 2,500 people. Based on past experience, during that month, the team will:
- Deliver 7 babies
- Treat 12 malaria patients
- Treat 14 pneumonia patients

Our lives have lots of inhibitors and frustrations that impede how we seek to change the world around us. Fortunately, there are pockets of opportunities that opens avenues for kindness and compassion to flow.

Reflections on a crisis

Over a decade ago, I traveled to Syria. It’s a beautiful land — rich in antiquities, sweeping landscapes and a powerful sense of mankind’s cultural and religious heritage. Now, the media and the world are fixated on Syria. There’s good reason to be appalled by the random, senseless violence in that land.

The core issue in Syria could be summed up as the people in the government are using its power to refuse the interests and rights of the people, who seek respect for their cultures and lifestyle.

Four thousand miles to the east, a similar drama has been on-going — but it escapes the world’s attention. In Burma’s eastern and northern lands, a people in control of the government use its power to oppress people who seek only to live free with their cultures, languages and lands respected.

Our conundrum with Burma is exacerbated by a regime which told the world it reformed itself – releasing political prisoners, proclaiming a ceasefire and announcing it was open for business. The U.S. and other industrialized nations chose to believe these pronouncements – and released their businesses to invade (I mean invest) in Burma’s fertile, under-developed economy.

Companies are now rushing into the land where Facebook accounts are skyrocketing – further proof that all must be good in Burma. Chevron, General Electric, Visa and Coca-cola are a few of the prominent American businesses now seeking to invest, developing the human and natural resources that are part of the under-performing economy of Burma.

The Burmese apologists ignore other news. In its latest rating, the World Health Organization ranked Burma dead last among nation-state health care systems – a move downward from second worst previously. Burma’s destitute neighbors, such as Laos and Cambodia, spend double what the Burma regime commits to its citizen’s health care.

When asked, Burma’s Ministry of Health Yaw Myint replied that spending money on medical services for the poor was not necessary.

The regime’s health care and other services in major urban areas, like Rangoon and Mandalay, look like the Mayo clinic compared to the desolate medical care available in northern eastern Burma – Kachin and Karen states.

Karen State, home of the Karen people, has seen 60 years of civil war. Isolated by the Burma government – disease, malnutrition and poverty inflict a tragic statistical record. Toss in an occasional land mine for excitement. One in seven children will not see their 5th birthday. One in 12 mothers will die as a result of childbirth.

The reports from Karen State and other areas remain disturbing and disappointing.
Ne Oo lives in a refugee camp in Thailand. He remembers the day the Burma army burnt his village down. The army forced his older brother to work for them and then killed him. He shares that the army requires everyone to pay them “taxes”. “Taxes” is the Burmese ‘politically correct’ way to say the army steals from the villagers.

Meanwhile, further north, the Burma army continues its offensive military campaign against the Kachin, Shan and other minorities. In June 2011, the Burma army broke a 17 year ceasefire and attacked these peoples. Despite presidential decrees announcing numerous ceasefires, the army continues its assault.

Over the past summer, the army has attacked several times each month. As recently as August 28th, it attacked Kachin villages in northern Burma. The army fired mortars, destroying homes. In one incident, it arrested men from the village and forced them to carry supplies to the next skirmish. As the battle wound down, they shot and killed one of the men – a father of six children – in the back as the Burma army retreated.

The next week, on September 3rd, a Burma army unit entered the northern Burma village of Nhka Ga, detained several women and girls, took them into the near-by woods and raped them. The army suspected that the people of Nhka Ga village supported militia forces. The sexual assault was one means to intimidate the village leaders to cease such support. Horrific. Disgusting. Can anyone tell me why a US business would want to work with a government that practices this form of intimidation?

As a result of the renewed military offensive in northern Burma, an additional 100,000 villagers have fled their homes. They join the hundreds of thousands of Karen and others from eastern Burma who have fled over the past decades to find sanctuary in the near-by jungles or across the border in Thailand.

Isolated from any social services or similar support, the Kachin, Karen, Shan and other peoples endure appalling conditions. Malnutrition amplifies the inherent risk of child birth, malaria and dysentery – creating mortality rates up to 50 times higher than those in the U.S.

There is small hope for these people – it comes from within. Backpack medics, traveling with a mix of 3-5 experienced and novice medics, bring rudimentary health services to the people. The typical backpack medic team will serve 2,000 people living in a dozen villages.

Burma Humanitarian Mission supports backpack medic teams – providing them with medicine and associated supplies. Since the violence erupted in northern Burma, BHM has added support for 2 of the new medic teams operating in northern Kachin State. These teams carry larger quantities and types of medicine. The teams need over 36,000 doses of medicine every six months at a cost of $4 a day for all their basic medicine needs and an additional $3 a day to ensure they have the right anti-malarial drugs each day.

Do the 200+ medicines dispensed each day matter? Absolutely. Where the backpack medics operate, the malaria mortality rate has been reduced by 48% while the maternal mortality rate is slashed up to 75%. A young infant’s chance of celebrating her fifth birthday triples. The backpack medics are dedicated and trained. Equipped with the right medicine, they save lives.

As we listen to the cacophony that is called political discourse, we realize there is no consensus on what the US and world should do in Syria. In Burma, you and I have clear options to act and make a difference. Support to community based organizations, like Backpack medics, is a clear way to act with even the most modest resources and make a difference.

Evil in the world

Over a decade ago, I traveled to Syria. It’s a beautiful land — rich in antiquities, sweeping landscapes and a powerful sense of mankind’s cultural and religious heritage. Now, the media and the world are fixated on Syria. There’s good reason to be appalled by the random, senseless violence in that land.

The core issue in Syria could be summed up as the people in the government are using its power to refuse the interests and rights of the people, who seek respect for their cultures and lifestyle.

Four thousand miles to the east, a similar drama has been on-going — but it escapes the world’s attention. In Burma’s eastern and northern lands, a people in control of the government use its power to oppress people who seek only to live free with their cultures, languages and lands respected.
Our conundrum with Burma is exacerbated by a regime which told the world it reformed itself – releasing political prisoners, proclaiming a ceasefire and announcing it was open for business. The U.S. and other industrialized nations chose to believe these pronouncements – and released their businesses to invade (I mean invest) in Burma’s fertile, under-developed economy.

Companies are now rushing into the land where Facebook accounts are skyrocketing – further proof that all must be good in Burma. Chevron, General Electric, Visa and Coca-cola are a few of the prominent American businesses now seeking to invest, developing the human and natural resources that are part of the under-performing economy of Burma.
The Burmese apologists ignore other news. In its latest rating, the World Health Organization ranked Burma dead last among nation-state health care systems – a move downward from second worst previously. Burma’s destitute neighbors, such as Laos and Cambodia, spend double what the Burma regime commits to its citizen’s health care.

When asked, Burma’s Ministry of Health Yaw Myint replied that spending money on medical services for the poor was not necessary.

The regime’s health care and other services in major urban areas, like Rangoon and Mandalay, look like the Mayo clinic compared to the desolate medical care available in northern eastern Burma – Kachin and Karen states.

Karen State, home of the Karen people, has seen 60 years of civil war. Isolated by the Burma government – disease, malnutrition and poverty inflict a tragic statistical record. Toss in an occasional land mine for excitement. One in seven children will not see their 5th birthday. One in 12 mothers will die as a result of childbirth.

The reports from Karen State and other areas remain disturbing and disappointing.

Ne Oo lives in a refugee camp in Thailand. He remembers the day the Burma army burnt his village down. The army forced his older brother to work for them and then killed him. He shares that the army requires everyone to pay them “taxes”. “Taxes” is the Burmese ‘politically correct’ way to say the army steals from the villagers.

Meanwhile, further north, the Burma army continues its offensive military campaign against the Kachin, Shan and other minorities. In June 2011, the Burma army broke a 17 year ceasefire and attacked these peoples. Despite presidential decrees announcing numerous ceasefires, the army continues its assault.

Over the past summer, the army has attacked several times each month. As recently as August 28th, it attacked Kachin villages in northern Burma. The army fired mortars, destroying homes. In one incident, it arrested men from the village and forced them to carry supplies to the next skirmish. As the battle wound down, they shot and killed one of the men – a father of six children – in the back as the Burma army retreated.

The next week, on September 3rd, a Burma army unit entered the northern Burma village of Nhka Ga, detained several women and girls, took them into the near-by woods and raped them. The army suspected that the people of Nhka Ga village supported militia forces. The sexual assault was one means to intimidate the village leaders to cease such support. Horrific. Disgusting. Can anyone tell me why a US business would want to work with a government that practices this form of intimidation?

As a result of the renewed military offensive in northern Burma, an additional 100,000 villagers have fled their homes. They join the hundreds of thousands of Karen and others from eastern Burma who have fled over the past decades to find sanctuary in the near-by jungles or across the border in Thailand.

Isolated from any social services or similar support, the Kachin, Karen, Shan and other peoples endure appalling conditions. Malnutrition amplifies the inherent risk of child birth, malaria and dysentery – creating mortality rates up to 50 times higher than those in the U.S.

There is small hope for these people – it comes from within. Backpack medics, traveling with a mix of 3-5 experienced and novice medics, bring rudimentary health services to the people. The typical backpack medic team will serve 2,000 people living in a dozen villages.

Burma Humanitarian Mission supports backpack medic teams – providing them with medicine and associated supplies. Since the violence erupted in northern Burma, BHM has added support for 2 of the new medic teams operating in northern Kachin State. These teams carry larger quantities and types of medicine. The teams need over 36,000 doses of medicine every six months at a cost of $4 a day for all their basic medicine needs and an additional $3 a day to ensure they have the right anti-malarial drugs each day.

Do the 200+ medicines dispensed each day matter? Absolutely. Where the backpack medics operate, the malaria mortality rate has been reduced by 48% while the maternal mortality rate is slashed up to 75%. A young infant’s chance of celebrating her fifth birthday triples. The backpack medics are dedicated and trained. Equipped with the right medicine, they save lives.

As we listen to the cacophony that is called political discourse, we realize there is no consensus on what the US and world should do in Syria. In Burma, you and I have clear options to act and make a difference. Support to community based organizations, like Backpack medics, is a clear way to act with even the most modest resources and make a difference.

Update on Health Care in Burma

The media often portrays the news from Burma as positive. European and American companies announce decisions to invest in the Burmese economy – offering opportunities for the public and investors alike. Many in Burma call these days the ‘time of transition’.

Missing from the discussion, though, is what has not transpired for the people of Burma – particularly those living in the east and north. Water, food, education and health care – the foundation of a society – remain lacking and stunted. The Burma government is not investing in these basic services.

Two to three years after the Burma government launched its reforms, some key health indicators remain appalling. Malaria continues to stalk the population. Fifty percent of all malaria deaths in Asia are in Burma – in east and northern lands. Access to government health care remains non-existent. For those who can travel to the larger cities, such as Rangoon, they arrive only to find they cannot afford it. The Burmese health care system remains riddled with graft and corruption. Bribes are necessary for quality care and basic access in a timely manner.

Community Based Organizations or CBOs (sometimes called Cross Border Organizations) continue to provide the bulk of the medical, health and community based care in eastern Burma. The Burma army’s continued attacks in Kachin and Shan states has pulled at the CBO’s resources as they are moving backpack medic teams into these areas as well.

Meanwhile, large western donor nations are using the media headlines as rationale to reducing funding for refugees along the Thai-Burma border. The Thai-Burma Border Consortium (TBBC) recently announced that food rations will be reduced as the result of decreasing funding from donor nations. A sad commentary that western governments will invest dollars for development, but not to care for the most disadvantaged and vulnerable. Worse yet, is that the leaders of the nations cannot perceive the risk they have created.

Burma Humanitarian Mission remains committed to the people of Burma – the Karen, Kachin, Shan, Karenni, Mon and so many other minorities whom the government ignores or attacks. The backpack medics we support are compassionate and committed to their people. Their selflessness is inspiring. As is the support of people from all communities who donate to us, our runners and other projects.

We remain honored to connect two such outstanding elements of our societies.

Please consider a donation today through the Transparent Fish Fund.  This wonderful foundation, which focuses on health and education in Asia, will match your tax-deductible donation dollar for dollar, doubling it’s impact.  BHM’s medical aid programs are currently operating at a loss – we spend more money on medicines and medic training each year than we receive in donations for these programs.  BHM doesn’t have the cash reserves to continue to do this indefinitely.  Unlike large NGOs we don’t receive huge grants, so this matching grant from T-Fish is very important to us.    Yet, we remain committed to the people of Burma who need our help more than ever.   Please help!

Run for Refugees – results

Here are the times and placements for the first 100 finishers for the Run for Refugees.

Congratulations to everyone who placed and thank you to everyone who participated.  We had over 170 registered runners and raised over $3500 for scholarships and culture activities for refugees from Burma!

  BIB # Overall Time (min.sec) Last Name First Name Class Comments
510 1 17.28 Boerke Matthew AdultMen Overall first Man
641 2 18.30 Yeh Keven HS Men First High School Men
638 3 19.16 Adam Kuku HS Men Second High School Men
652 4 19.54 Freedman Penelope Adult Women 1st Adult Woman
592 5 20.19 Snyder Jared Adult Men
653 6 21.16 Freedman Daisy Adult Women 2nd Adult Woman
599 7 21.16 Rice Owain HS Men 3rd High School Men
517 8 21.19 Casper Troy Adult Men
503 9 21.22 Anderson Shawn Adult Men
525 10 21.22 Costello Mario Adult men
660 11 21.35 Fuentes Jaime Adult Men
596 12 21.44 Summers Rob Adult Men
586 13 21.48 Rice Rob Adult Men
669 14 21.55 Brown Jack HS Men
561 15 22.40 Matheson Frank Adult Men
636 16 22.42 Skinner Kari Adult Women 3rd Adult Woman
611 17 22.56 Allison Savannah HS Women First High School Woman
634 18 22.57 Shelton Morgan Adult Women
597 19 22.57 Summers Erin Adult Women
594 20 23.03 Stickney Zachary Adult Men
677 21 23.18 Maitonzi Amani Adult Men
519 22 23.32 Chiades Hector Adult Men
649 23 23.55 Gretz Ryan Adult Men
573 24 24.28 Spotted Elk Nieves Adult Women
668 25          25.00 Nahas Nate Adult Men
588 26          25.02 Rowland Angela Adult women
509 27 25.37 Black Veronica Pre-Girl
648 28          25.41 Wyiie Anne Adult Women
651 29          25.47 Larsen Missy Adult Women
550 30 25.58 Matheson Frankie Intermediate Boy First Intermediate Boy
646 31          26.10 Tobin Brian Adult Men
639 32          26.18 Tamang Kumar HS Men
629 33          26.22 Hills Steve Adult Men
595 34          26.26 Youngberg Mike Adult Men
664 35 26.52 Nahas Noah Intermediate Boy
645 36 26.54 Wylie Bob Adult Men
666 37 27.17 Christenson Jen Adult Women
511 38 27.21 Boerke Susan Adult Women
630 39 27.27 Butler Brian Adult Men
622 40 27.30 Miramontes Pahool Unk
530 41 27.33 Egnew Jessica HS Women 2nd High School Woman
528 42 27.34 Egnew Matt Adult Men
523 43 27.45 Brown Gerald Senior Men First Senior Men
609 44 27.49 Kadlec Jaret Pre-Boy
631 45 27.52 Solomon Margaret Adult Women
637 46          27.52 Rabin Mara Adult Women
524 47          28.01 Cooper Margaret Adult Women
516 48 28.16 Campbell-Lee Merrie Adult Women
527 49 28.21 Echols Awana Adult Women
673 50          28.31 Alvie Jake Adult men
663 51          28.45 Cala Liz Adult Women
640 52          28.46 Tamang Man Intermediate Boy
564 53 28.48 McConkie Elissa Adult Women
647 54          28.53 Coline Mauren Adult Women
628 55 29.00 Hills Melissa Adult Women
633 56 30.11 Stephan Yukiko Adult Women
536 57 30.16 Frendt Zenia Adult Women
546 58 30.16 Knoll Chrisa Adult Women
603 59 30.27 Thompson Liz Adult Women
650 60          30.45 Sveldo Mariela Adult Women
526 61 31.05 Cranney Cassandra Adult Women
607 62 31.42 Youngberg Ross Adult Men
520 63 31.45 Chipman Brody Adult Men
627 64 31.51 Williams Alyssa Adult Women
583 65 32.13 Powell McKenna Adult Women
590 66 32.26 Skeen Meltche Adult
531 67 32.28 Egnew Jerilynn Intermediate Girl
529 68 32.30 Egnew Sarah Adult Women
565 69 32.51 Miller Laura Adult Women
566 70 32.51 Miller Chloe Adult Women
602 71 34.07 Williams Rebecca Adult Women
656 72          34.18 Rich Rebecca Adult Women
676 73          34.24 Mang Joshua High School Men
621 74 35.10 Arvizu Rosa Adult Women
620 75 35.12 Miramontes Oliver Adult men
582 76 38.06 Park Jennifer Adult women
683 77          39.26 Collins Kate Pre-Girl
560 78 40.34 Martinsen Vince Adult Men
501 79 41.05 Akin Oye Adult Men
680 80          41.57 Elkins Candy
604 81 42.23 Thorne Gale Adult Women
578 82 42.25 Nichitin Oxana Adult Women
535 83 42.52 Garcia Liz Adult Women
521 84 42.54 Christensen Kim Adult Women
562 85 43.25 Matheson Laxmi Adult Women
659 86          43.43 Lipjankie Kanita Adult Women
558 87 45.16 Martial Jean-Phillippe Adult men
549 88 45.17 Martial Christine Intermediate Girl
613 89 47.21 Allison Shelby Elementary Girl
502 90 47.22 Allison Jeff Adult Men
610 91 47.22 Kadlec Kelly Adult women
654 92          47.23 Stringham Amelia Intermediate girl
655 93          47.23 Stringham Abby intermediate girl
643 94          47.34 Otterstrom Isabel intermediate girl
644 95          47.34 Otterstrom Erin Adult Women
584 96 48.24 Putnam Tammy Adult Women
589 97 48.24 Setterberg Michelle Adult Women
616 98 49.17 Larsen Dennis Adult men
615 99 50.22 Hall Jordan Elementary Girl
540 100 51.03 Hall Bridgett Adult Women