2016 Run for Refugees Results

Here are the Fun Run results as best as we can extract. A few unknowns…are attributed to not being able to make out the bib of the runner as they went by our video camera.

Awesome effort everyone! And we appreciate your support so much!

Place Time Bib Name
1 18:24 175 Jerrett Swarr
2 20:42 173 Kevin Cantrell
3 21:55 200 Unk
4 22:44 456 Bill Schmid
23:44 185 Melissa Manville
5 23:45 174 Sarah Ellington
6 23:45 177 Virtoria Ito
7 24:11:00 3957 Sky Barnes
8 24:41:00 3981 Ken Briercheck
9 24:41:00 3975 Irene Lee
10 24:44:00 180 Natalie Callinan
11 24:48:00 467 UNK
12 24:45:00 422 Sean Reid
24:49:00 457 Traci Aguirre
13 24:59:00 458 Doug Aguirre
14 25:14:00 171 Kristin Ahmed
15 25:17:00 3978 UNK
16 25:34:00 3995 Joe Hansen
17 25:37:00 427 Chloe Miller
18 25:42:00 465 Claire Baglee
19 26:22:00 202 Lasann Trawally
20 26:44:00 417 Vanina Harkova
21 26:52:00 3956 Brett Johns
22 27:25:00 172 UNK
23 27:26:00 201 Jen Christenson
24 27:53:00 3872 UNK
25 28:28:00 3973 Addie Amini
26 28:28:00 3974 Catherine Andelin
27 29:24:00 436 Benjamin Monson
28 29:40:00 203 Neil Zussman
29 29:55:00 438 Daniel Monson
30 29:56:00 3994 Salma Moosa
31 30:23:00 3996 Lorene Lillywhite
32 30:24:00 405 Heidi Ruster
33 30:43:00 3998 Emily Ostler
34 30:44:00 3993 Sam Taylor
35 31:00:00 432 Gerald Brown
36 31:01:00
37 31:07:00 3992 David Walke
38 31:08:00 3991 Kika Chelaru
39 31:09:00 3958 Liz Yonashiro
40 31:15:00 3997 David McClellan
41 31:22:00 448 Ryan Turner
42 32:09:00 204 Cathy Whinnery
43 32:20:00 184 Nick Manville
44 32:21:00 185 Melissa Manville
45 32:45:00 426 Laura Miller
46 32:50:00 3989 Leandro Andrade
47 32:50:00 3988 Kimberly Andrade
48 33:09:00 3999 Sally Aerts
49 33:09:00 4000 Sven Solvik
50 33:20:00 431 Nick Walton
51 33:21:00 3962 Nicole Kaye
52 33:28:00 420 Mahala Ruddell
53 33:38:00 459 Samantha Morris
54 33:56:00 437 Hannah Monson
55 34:03:00 409 Ashley Wells
56 34:07:00 439 Mary Monson
57 34:09:00 435 Matthew Monson
58 34:20:00 434 Helen Monson
59 34:20:00 442 Emma Monson
60 34:21:00 425 amber seidel
61 35:34:00 460 Joseph Morris
62 36:18:00 3976 Nikki Heaston

Jennifer Miescke’s Run for Burma

OAS Girls Run the World
Jennifer Miescke, Louisville, Kentucky

In my experience as an ESL (English as a Second Language) teacher, I have had the opportunity to teach many Burmese refugee students. They are some of the most kind, respectful, and hardworking students; their resilience is admirable. In an effort to give back to this community, I signed up for BHM’s Run for Burma, Marine Corps Marathon team to make a difference in the lives of people in rural Burma, but it is the generosity of the students at my school who have made a difference in my life.

My mom always told me, “Empathy is a verb, not an adjective.” The empathy put into action by the students at my school leaves me feeling optimistic for the future of this world. Last week, I hosted a fundraising competition at the school where I teach. The students raised $490! This is overwhelmingly generous, as I teach at a low-income, Title I school — 94% of our students receive free/reduced lunch. My school is beautifully diverse with 14% of our all-female student population being English language learners, many of whom are refugees from Burma, Somalia, and Iraq.

I’m humbled by the support I’ve received, not just for myself for the run, but for the people of Burma. An adorable Somali girl handed me a note last week that read, “I hope you receive just the right amount of money you need to save lives. I’m donating what I can. Love you. BURMA!” Her sweet note moved me to tears. She’s from Somalia, a place her family fled as refugees, much like the people of Burma. In this moment I realized that by running the Marine Corps Marathon for the Run for Burma team I’ve inspired a little world peace, even if it’s just within the walls of my school.

(This was sent by one of this year’s Run for Burma team members – we are humbled and honored to post it with her permission).

Run for Refugees Timing Results

Thanks everyone who participated in this year’s Run for Refugees. It was a great success! We look forward to next year!

Place Time Bib Name
1 18:15 1211 Ellis Robinson
2 18:28 1225 KuKu
3 18:58 1243 Patrick Muhindo
4 19:02 1202 Michael Cahil
5 20:18 714 Owain Rice
6 20:30 1239 Prathusha Boppana
7 20:32 1241 Jack Brown
8 21:31 1230 Barbara Smith
9 21:35 5267 Scott Smith
10 21:54 720 Eric Stritter
11 22:32 728 David Osokow
12 22:35 708 Robert Rice
13 22:48 1234 Travis Waind
14 23:22 1222 Jason Burrow-Sanchez
15 23:30 1252 Cherie Mockli
16 23:56 1212 Steve Lynch
17 0:24 1258 Badal Mouhoumad
18 0:25:17 1237 Name Unknown
19 0:25:35 709 Jeff Belnap
20 0:25:35 1245 Yogesh Gurung
21 0:25:54 713 Catherine Beerman
22 0:26:05 711 Angela Rowland
23 0:26:10 1204 Lay Ta Paw
24 0:26:20 unk Unknown
25 0:27:03 1231 Markus Aedo
26 0:27:12 721 Daniel LeBaron
27 0:27:33 1215 Carrie Mayne
27 0:27:35 743 Lawrence Bartlett
28 0:27:36 738 Elizabeth Hendrix
29 0:27:36 739 Joey Hendrix
30 0:28:11 1244 Dhan Kumar Tamang
31 0:28:29 731 Octavio Jacobo
32 0:29:08 745 Catherine Anderson
33 0:29:12 1209 Dhan Man Tamang
34 0:29:12 1263 Kathryn Schapper
35 0:29:13 1261 Chloe Miller
36 0:29:41 725 Michael Pekarske
37 0:29:44 1235 Heidi Ruster
38 0:29:44 1218 Ali Kasheed ?
39 0:29:48 1221 Jennifer Sanchez
40 0:30:02 733 Kika Chelaru
41 0:30:06 1232 Steve Mockli
42 0:30:07 1221 Jennifer Sanchez
43 0:30:10 1233 Chris Mockli
44 0:30:11 Unk unknown woman
45 0:30:12 734 Rebecca Gardner
46 0:30:41 1224 Anhtuya Guity
47 0:31:19 695 Jeanette Colvin
48 0:31:24 1251 Kun Knettles
49 0:31:29 1250 Steve Knettles
50 0:31:38 1207 Htooluy Paw
51 0:31:38 1206 Law Eh Dah
52 0:31:48 724 Stephanie Caille
53 0:31:48 723 Adrienne Smith
54 0:32:44 1228 Anisa Ali
55 0:32:51 696 Carissa Monroy
56 0:33:07 744 Thomas Haglund
57 0:33:07 1269 Amy Steele
58 0:33:13 727 Krystal Rogers-Nelson
59 0:33:14 748 Janet Rogers
60 0:33:33 1201 Ashley Janssen
61 0:34:00 715 Aimee Mitchell
62 0:34:30 1240 Jenine Wood
63 0:34:35 1270 Laura Miller
64 0:35:27 1242 Gerald Brown
65 0:35:30 741 Randy White
66 0:36:29 719 Justine Heaux
67 0:36:29 5269 Rudy Rosas
68 0:36:49 718 Beth Garstka
69 0:36:49 12xx Unknown Woman
70 0:36:55 746 Ali Perez
71 0:36:58 737 Stacey Hoopes
72 0:37:00 716 Sharah Meservy
73 0:37:48 732 Nancy Mayhall
74 0:38:01 1229 Faruse Ali
75 0:38:09 707 Ali Zalega
76 0:39:17 730 Jenny Billy
77 0:38:39 1267 Mustafa Al Janabi
78 0:39:43 1260 Amina Sheikh
79 0:39:45 1262 Alison Smith
80 0:39:46 1238 Jemima Singoma
81 0:40:22 1205 Pawknwe Eh
82 0:40:32 1268 Brenda Eggett
83 0:41:05 1208 Sheila Brown
84 0:41:05 1210 Matt Brown
85 0:41:25 1217 Anna Person
86 0:41:28 1219 Claire Peterson
87 0:42:35 1203 John Cahill
88 0:44:00 742 Verlee White
89 0:44:00 729 Tammy Putnam
90 0:44:00 701 Michelle Setterberg
91 0:44:00 1226 Richard Brown
92 0:44:00 1227 Pam Jowett

BHM is honored to be a Ronald McDonald House Charities Global Grant Recipient

This funding will to provide mobile medical care to 3,200 to 6,400 children in the conflict zones of northern and eastern Burma via 3-6 additional Backpack Medics teams, who provide medical and community health services to children 5 and under.

The Burma regime has isolated the eastern and northern sections of the country, allowing no health care. For 60 years, the regime has launched an aggressive campaign of violence and forced labor on the Karen, Kachin and other minorities in the eastern and northern Burma. The results are horrific: infant, child and maternal mortality rates from malaria, dysentery, malnutrition, pneumonia and other preventable diseases is extraordinarily high. 1 in 7 children dies before the age of 5 where there are no medic teams.

Backpack medic teams of 3-5 trained health workers travel throughout the areas providing medical care and community health services focused on children. 60% of children’s deaths could be prevented with basic medicine (such as penicillin), provided by the backpack medics. The impact where the medics reach is profound: malaria deaths are down by 48% and 42% for dysentery among children 5 and under. Likewise, the maternal mortality rate is reduced by over two-thirds.

Care is provided at two levels. First Village Health Volunteers (VHV) reinforce sanitation and disease prevention practices, are continually present in each village. In addition, traditional birth assistants provide midwifery support to pregnant women and newborns. Second, backpack medic teams visit 9-12 villages/month (2-3 days/village), providing responsive and preventative care. Responsive care includes diagnosing and administering medicines for malaria, dysentery, pneumonia, worms and malnutrition common in infants. Preventative care includes distribution of Vitamin A, de-worming meds, building latrines and sanitary water supplies for villages and school.

The funds will provide medicine kits to 3 to 6 new backpack medic teams urgently needed in Kachin State, where the regime violated an 18-year ceasefire by attacking villages while seizing land. An additional 250,000 Kachin people have fled their homes.

The backpack medic program is unique in that it brings the care and medicine to the infants as their families seek sanctuary in Internally Displaced Person camps or in isolated villages. Currently, the medics serve a population of 205,000 people each year. The medic teams are 100% ethnic minorities from Burma – they are caring for their own.

Read the Ronald McDonald House Charities Global press release to learn more about the other amazing projects being supported.

BHM is honored to be a Ronald McDonald House Charities Global Grant Recipient

This funding will to provide mobile medical care to 3,200 to 6,400 children in the conflict zones of northern and eastern Burma via 3-6 additional Backpack Medics teams, who provide medical and community health services to children 5 and under.

The Burma regime has isolated the eastern and northern sections of the country, allowing no health care. For 60 years, the regime has launched an aggressive campaign of violence and forced labor on the Karen, Kachin and other minorities in the eastern and northern Burma. The results are horrific: infant, child and maternal mortality rates from malaria, dysentery, malnutrition, pneumonia and other preventable diseases is extraordinarily high. 1 in 7 children dies before the age of 5 where there are no medic teams.

Backpack medic teams of 3-5 trained health workers travel throughout the areas providing medical care and community health services focused on children. 60% of children’s deaths could be prevented with basic medicine (such as penicillin), provided by the backpack medics. The impact where the medics reach is profound: malaria deaths are down by 48% and 42% for dysentery among children 5 and under. Likewise, the maternal mortality rate is reduced by over two-thirds.

Care is provided at two levels. First Village Health Volunteers (VHV) reinforce sanitation and disease prevention practices, are continually present in each village. In addition, traditional birth assistants provide midwifery support to pregnant women and newborns. Second, backpack medic teams visit 9-12 villages/month (2-3 days/village), providing responsive and preventative care. Responsive care includes diagnosing and administering medicines for malaria, dysentery, pneumonia, worms and malnutrition common in infants. Preventative care includes distribution of Vitamin A, de-worming meds, building latrines and sanitary water supplies for villages and school.

The funds will provide medicine kits to 3 to 6 new backpack medic teams urgently needed in Kachin State, where the regime violated an 18-year ceasefire by attacking villages while seizing land. An additional 250,000 Kachin people have fled their homes.

The backpack medic program is unique in that it brings the care and medicine to the infants as their families seek sanctuary in Internally Displaced Person camps or in isolated villages. Currently, the medics serve a population of 205,000 people each year. The medic teams are 100% ethnic minorities from Burma – they are caring for their own.

Read the Ronald McDonald House Charities Global press release to learn more about the other amazing projects being supported.

Run for Refugees – results

Here are the times and placements for the first 100 finishers for the Run for Refugees.

Congratulations to everyone who placed and thank you to everyone who participated.  We had over 170 registered runners and raised over $3500 for scholarships and culture activities for refugees from Burma!

  BIB # Overall Time (min.sec) Last Name First Name Class Comments
510 1 17.28 Boerke Matthew AdultMen Overall first Man
641 2 18.30 Yeh Keven HS Men First High School Men
638 3 19.16 Adam Kuku HS Men Second High School Men
652 4 19.54 Freedman Penelope Adult Women 1st Adult Woman
592 5 20.19 Snyder Jared Adult Men
653 6 21.16 Freedman Daisy Adult Women 2nd Adult Woman
599 7 21.16 Rice Owain HS Men 3rd High School Men
517 8 21.19 Casper Troy Adult Men
503 9 21.22 Anderson Shawn Adult Men
525 10 21.22 Costello Mario Adult men
660 11 21.35 Fuentes Jaime Adult Men
596 12 21.44 Summers Rob Adult Men
586 13 21.48 Rice Rob Adult Men
669 14 21.55 Brown Jack HS Men
561 15 22.40 Matheson Frank Adult Men
636 16 22.42 Skinner Kari Adult Women 3rd Adult Woman
611 17 22.56 Allison Savannah HS Women First High School Woman
634 18 22.57 Shelton Morgan Adult Women
597 19 22.57 Summers Erin Adult Women
594 20 23.03 Stickney Zachary Adult Men
677 21 23.18 Maitonzi Amani Adult Men
519 22 23.32 Chiades Hector Adult Men
649 23 23.55 Gretz Ryan Adult Men
573 24 24.28 Spotted Elk Nieves Adult Women
668 25          25.00 Nahas Nate Adult Men
588 26          25.02 Rowland Angela Adult women
509 27 25.37 Black Veronica Pre-Girl
648 28          25.41 Wyiie Anne Adult Women
651 29          25.47 Larsen Missy Adult Women
550 30 25.58 Matheson Frankie Intermediate Boy First Intermediate Boy
646 31          26.10 Tobin Brian Adult Men
639 32          26.18 Tamang Kumar HS Men
629 33          26.22 Hills Steve Adult Men
595 34          26.26 Youngberg Mike Adult Men
664 35 26.52 Nahas Noah Intermediate Boy
645 36 26.54 Wylie Bob Adult Men
666 37 27.17 Christenson Jen Adult Women
511 38 27.21 Boerke Susan Adult Women
630 39 27.27 Butler Brian Adult Men
622 40 27.30 Miramontes Pahool Unk
530 41 27.33 Egnew Jessica HS Women 2nd High School Woman
528 42 27.34 Egnew Matt Adult Men
523 43 27.45 Brown Gerald Senior Men First Senior Men
609 44 27.49 Kadlec Jaret Pre-Boy
631 45 27.52 Solomon Margaret Adult Women
637 46          27.52 Rabin Mara Adult Women
524 47          28.01 Cooper Margaret Adult Women
516 48 28.16 Campbell-Lee Merrie Adult Women
527 49 28.21 Echols Awana Adult Women
673 50          28.31 Alvie Jake Adult men
663 51          28.45 Cala Liz Adult Women
640 52          28.46 Tamang Man Intermediate Boy
564 53 28.48 McConkie Elissa Adult Women
647 54          28.53 Coline Mauren Adult Women
628 55 29.00 Hills Melissa Adult Women
633 56 30.11 Stephan Yukiko Adult Women
536 57 30.16 Frendt Zenia Adult Women
546 58 30.16 Knoll Chrisa Adult Women
603 59 30.27 Thompson Liz Adult Women
650 60          30.45 Sveldo Mariela Adult Women
526 61 31.05 Cranney Cassandra Adult Women
607 62 31.42 Youngberg Ross Adult Men
520 63 31.45 Chipman Brody Adult Men
627 64 31.51 Williams Alyssa Adult Women
583 65 32.13 Powell McKenna Adult Women
590 66 32.26 Skeen Meltche Adult
531 67 32.28 Egnew Jerilynn Intermediate Girl
529 68 32.30 Egnew Sarah Adult Women
565 69 32.51 Miller Laura Adult Women
566 70 32.51 Miller Chloe Adult Women
602 71 34.07 Williams Rebecca Adult Women
656 72          34.18 Rich Rebecca Adult Women
676 73          34.24 Mang Joshua High School Men
621 74 35.10 Arvizu Rosa Adult Women
620 75 35.12 Miramontes Oliver Adult men
582 76 38.06 Park Jennifer Adult women
683 77          39.26 Collins Kate Pre-Girl
560 78 40.34 Martinsen Vince Adult Men
501 79 41.05 Akin Oye Adult Men
680 80          41.57 Elkins Candy
604 81 42.23 Thorne Gale Adult Women
578 82 42.25 Nichitin Oxana Adult Women
535 83 42.52 Garcia Liz Adult Women
521 84 42.54 Christensen Kim Adult Women
562 85 43.25 Matheson Laxmi Adult Women
659 86          43.43 Lipjankie Kanita Adult Women
558 87 45.16 Martial Jean-Phillippe Adult men
549 88 45.17 Martial Christine Intermediate Girl
613 89 47.21 Allison Shelby Elementary Girl
502 90 47.22 Allison Jeff Adult Men
610 91 47.22 Kadlec Kelly Adult women
654 92          47.23 Stringham Amelia Intermediate girl
655 93          47.23 Stringham Abby intermediate girl
643 94          47.34 Otterstrom Isabel intermediate girl
644 95          47.34 Otterstrom Erin Adult Women
584 96 48.24 Putnam Tammy Adult Women
589 97 48.24 Setterberg Michelle Adult Women
616 98 49.17 Larsen Dennis Adult men
615 99 50.22 Hall Jordan Elementary Girl
540 100 51.03 Hall Bridgett Adult Women

 

Interview with author and activist Edith Mirante

Edith Mirante has travelled extensively into some of the most remote corners of Burma’s war zones, which is courageous beyond anything most of us ever imagine.  Her books about the people of Burma share a deep love and respect for the people of Burma.  Her book, Down the Rat Hole, chronicles her travels in Kachin State offering insights to the military repression the people of Burma have endured.  And back in the 1990s, Edith encouraged the founding members of BHM to travel to the Thai-Burma border, so in many regards she is the reason we came to be.   For all of these reasons, Edith Mirante is my personal hero.

I am so honored that Edith has shared her thoughts about the current situation in Burma in the following Q & A.  I highly encourage everyone to read her books.  They’re not only great to learn about Burma, but well written travel stories, from which you’ll come away both inspired and blown away by her sense of courage and adventure.

Q: One of the themes of Burmese Looking Glass is freedom and self-determination. In the book, the quest of the ethnic groups’ of Burma for self-determination in the face of extreme human rights violations and repression is juxtaposed against your journey as an empowered young woman to explore the world and your choice to use your freedom to advocate for the self-determination of others. How does the concept of freedom and self-determination differ from the concept of democracy?

A: I think democracy is a well-defined system of government, with the public having some level of control through elections. This of course can be corrupted and manipulated in various ways, but at least it provides some level of protection against rule by military or aristocratic elites. In Burma, there was complete domination by the military, from 1962 to 2011, when a parliament with a lot of military men in it took over. Now there’s more representation from outside of the military, but they are still the majority in the “civilian” government. Self-determination is complex and and involves the ability of groups of people to decide for themselves from the ground up about various things that affect their lives. For particular ethnic groups, this has often been denied in favor of larger national or colonial entities. That’s especially true in Burma, which led to a lack of freedom on many levels — speech, religion, movement. Now there are improvements in some areas, like freedom of the press, but not as much in self-determination for ethnic groups.

Q: For years, people have rallied for democracy in Burma and the personal freedom for Aung San Suu Kyi and others. Now, significant numbers of political prisoners have been released, nascent individual freedoms are emerging in urban areas and new political parties are appearing. What do you see as the impacts of these developments on the lives and future of the Karen, Kachin, Shan and other ethnic groups? Do you feel that the ethnic minorities of Burma are closer or farther from realizing their dream of self-determination now that Burma is a burgeoning democracy?

A: The Burmese or Burman people are the largest ethnic group in the country, but if you add up the other ethnicities, that comes to a bigger share of the population. So they don’t like to think of themselves as “minorities” but as “ethnic nationalities” who should have equal rights and local autonomy in a much looser arrangement than the current very Burman-centric state which has existed since independence from Britain. It would probably be a federal system, and that is not recognized in the current constitution which the military devised for the country. So that’s some ways off, but at least now there can be open discussion of these issues and organizing around them.

Q: The Burma army waged a 60-year campaign of violence against the Karen, but then offered a ceasefire with them a year ago. Meanwhile, the regime has now broken a 17-year ceasefire in Kachin State. How do you think the minorities should view the sincerity of the regime’s overtures toward peace? Can they trust the regime? Should they trust the regime?

A: The appalling war against the Kachins, with the same pattern of human rights violations against civilians as had always been going on, is proof that the government should not be trusted. Other groups with ceasefire arrangements are very aware of this and proceed with caution, although they do hope for an eventual political settlement resulting in a federal system. I was in Laiza, Kachinland, a year ago — that’s the town under siege by the government’s artillery, jet fighters and helicopter gunships. They’ve held out for a long time, and that shows the Kachins’ extraordinary resilience and courage.

Q: Conflict and violence in Rakhine State has erupted recently. Why is this happening? What do you understand is going on?

A: The Muslims of western Burma are no threat to anybody and have been there throughout history, but they have become the target of ethnic cleansing. There is huge anti-Muslim prejudice among Buddhists in Burma. Somehow that is considered acceptable even though Buddhism teaches tolerance and compassion. The Muslims are usually very poor and look different, so they are easily bullied and scapegoated. Respected Buddhists like Aung San Suu Kyi who could stand up for them and discourage violence against them, don’t bother to help them. The Rakhine Buddhists who used to live with the Rohingya Muslims as neighbors, now get manipulated into trying to drive them out of the country.

Q: What are your concerns now that sanctions are being lifted and US corporations can now do business with the regime? Do you feel there is reason for caution? What role do you feel US activists can play?

A: There has been a major US corporate presence throughout the rule by the junta, which had a joint venture with Unocal, then Chevron. So even with sanctions, a US petroleum multinational helped finance the regime. And of course there has been investment by China and other countries all along, in resource extraction. So this is nothing new. What has changed is the ability of people in Burma to protest and publicize the effects of such investment without getting jailed or killed for it. Right now most of those protests involve Chinese investments, but if US companies come under the same objections, we can certainly add pressure through shareholder actions, boycotts and other means. One thing to be particularly aware of is land-grabbing for agribusiness like palm oil plantations, as well as mining and logging. Investments that could have a positive impact might include alternative energy, sustainable development, telecommunications and healthcare.

Q: Would you encourage or discourage your friends to visit the country of Burma at this time? If they do visit, what would you want them to pay attention to?

A: There’s no longer a tourism boycott. If travelers go, they should certainly look for ways to support the local peoples’ efforts in sustainable development, new media, architectural preservation, environmental protection, or the arts (traditional or avant garde.) People in Burma are always interested in foreigners and now you don’t have to smuggle in books or music, you can have a much more free and open exchange of ideas. But just because things seem pretty great in the cities now, don’t forget that there is awful poverty, especially in rural areas, and a terrible war going on in the north. An acquaintance is going on a bicycle tour of Burma soon, and I’ll encourage him to support the peace movement (against the war in Kachinland) perhaps by wearing a peace t-shirt and talking about it with people he meets. Of course supporting the outstanding work of Burma Humanitarian Mission is something I always suggest – donations can be made by anybody, whether or not they visit Burma or the neighboring countries.

Q: What are you working on now?

A:  I’ve just done a new Project Maje report on the use of air strikes in the war against the Kachins, and I continue to distribute information on the situations in northern and western Burma, as well as particular issues like mining and logging effects. My new book, “The Wind in the Bamboo: Journeys in Search of Asia’s ‘Negrito’ Indigenous Peoples” will be out soon from Orchid Press. It’s not about Burma but it is about other, very ancient, indigenous peoples of Asia who have been marginalized and discriminated against, and need their land rights protected. I traveled in Malaysia, the Philippines and India’s Andaman Islands to meet them and it was amazing.